Sunday, March 19, 2006

Baa Baa Rainbow Sheep

Baa Baa Black ... no Brown ... no Yellow ... no Rainbow sheep.

Who ever 's heard of "rainbow sheep".

So am I not to be called brown anymore? My delicious brown color, wheat brown, golden brown, caramel brown, coffee brown, chocolate brown. Am I then to be "Asian Indian"? And who is to say that "Asian Indian" won't become, in time, politically incorrect, like "Muslim" for instance?

So, then am I to be "of a certain minority community, melanin challenged, geographically hurdled, socially impaired, economically deprived"? Because I'm a brown middle-class Indian Muslim who does not figure on Page 3.

Racism has nothing to do with political correctness or the lack of it. In fact, it can simmer quite beautifully under the facade of political correctness.

Racism is of course, believing that people are different because they are differently colored, or belong to different geographical, social, economic backgrounds. Believing that someone is inferior because ... but also believing that someone is superior because ...

I'm happy to be "Brown and Lovely", thank you.

4 comments:

Mukul said...

completely agree. pc-ness basically comes from the 'oh-you-poor something or the other' feeling. 'let us GIVE you dignity, for we are in a position to give it' feeling..

Batul said...

Glad you agree. I find hypocritical politeness more demeaning than blatant in the face fundamentalism.

Indeterminacy said...

This makes me think of an anecdote I saw in the book "The Rains Came" by Louis Bromfield. It is attributed to Remarque. As I suspected, someone has posted the text into the marvelous Internet:

Two men sat in a bar. One said to the other, "Do you like Americans?" and the second man answered vigorously, "No."

"Do you like Frenchman?" asked the first.

"No," came the answer with equal vigor.

"Englishmen?"

"No."

"Germans?"

"No." here was a pause and the first man, raising his glass, asked, "Well, who do you like?"

Without hesitation the second man answered, "I like my friends."

[For this story the author is indebted to his friend Erich Maria Remarque]

Batul said...

Wonderful anecdote.